Search by country or region

Select a UN mechanism

Choose one or more sub-themes

Select one or more years of publication

Select true or false

Select a community

Theme Key

  • Stateless Persons
  • Nationality
  • Children
  • Discrimination
  • Implementing measures

Number of results found: 2020

Universal Periodic Review (UPR) 3rd

Haiti

131.202 Continue to improve the birth registration system, including by expanding the project that is already being implemented with the support of UNICEF. 

131.202 Continue to improve the birth registration system, including by expanding the project that is already being implemented with the support of UNICEF. 

Recommending State: Uruguay

Recommendation Accepted

Birth registration
Universal Periodic Review (UPR) 3rd

Haiti

131.221 Repeal any provision that could lead to statelessness, approve the draft nationality law in line with international standards, and modernize the civil registry service. 

131.221 Repeal any provision that could lead to statelessness, approve the draft nationality law in line with international standards, and modernize the civil registry service. 

Recommending State: Mexico

Recommendation Accepted

Legislative/Judicial/Administrative action
Universal Periodic Review (UPR) 3rd

Moldova

127.146 Adopt additional measures to reduce the incidence of maternal and child mortality, as well as to ensure that all births are registered. 

127.146 Adopt additional measures to reduce the incidence of maternal and child mortality, as well as to ensure that all births are registered. 

Recommending State: Brazil

Recommendation Accepted

Birth registration
Universal Periodic Review (UPR) 3rd

South Sudan

113.41 Accede to the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons and the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness. 

113.41 Accede to the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons and the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness

Recommending State: Cote d'Ivoire

Recommendation Accepted

International Instruments
Universal Periodic Review (UPR) 3rd

South Sudan

113.41 Accede to the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons and the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness. 

113.41 Accede to the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons and the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness

Recommending State: Eswatini

Recommendation Accepted

International Instruments
Universal Periodic Review (UPR) 3rd

South Sudan

113.41 Accede to the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons and the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness. 

113.41 Accede to the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons and the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness

Recommending State: Paraguay

Recommendation Accepted

International Instruments

Myanmar

18.     Education:  Nearly every Rohingya parent who the Special Rapporteur spoke with cited education shortfalls as their most pressing concern for their children.  52 percent of the estimated 918,841 Rohingya (or 477,797) in Bangladesh are children under the age of-18. The Special...

18.     Education:  Nearly every Rohingya parent who the Special Rapporteur spoke with cited education shortfalls as their most pressing concern for their children.  52 percent of the estimated 918,841 Rohingya (or 477,797) in Bangladesh are children under the age of-18. The Special Rapporteur takes note that the education needs for the children and youth in camps are tremendous.  In 2021, an estimated 515,042 Rohingya aged 3-24 needed education opportunities.  However, the Special Rapporteur notes 2021 funding targets in the Joint Response Plan only aimed to provide education, to 390,923 of them (100 percent of the 3-5 age group, 100 percent of 6-14, 70 percent of 15-18, and 15 percent of 19-24). According to the Inter-Sector Coordination Group (ISCG) Education Sector only 62 percent of the education plan was in fact funded (as of 30 October 2021). Bangladesh needs a significantly stronger level of support from the international community if this gap is going to be overcome.

23.     A Bangladesh senior official responded to the Special Rapporteur’s concerns regarding the education facility closures by stressing that (1) “these [Rohingya] are the people who have never been allowed to go to the schools in Myanmar,” (2) there is a lack of qualified teachers in the Rohingya community to provide good education, and (3) there is a potential for radicalization to occur in the unauthorized private schools.   The Special Rapporteur is concerned that a senior government official would dismiss concerns about education for Rohingya children because of the horrible conditions that Rohingya families faced in Rakhine State.  Reducing teacher salaries—as the 13 December circular mandates—is counterproductive to recruiting better qualified teachers. To address the potential for radicalization, closer engagement with the Rohingya community, the promotion of a vibrant moderate Rohingya civil society, and similar measures would be a more equitable approach than the closure of all private schools. 

85.     The roughly 600,000 Rohingya in Rakhine State continue to have their human rights systematically violated. More than 130,000 remain confined to IDP camps and even those living in villages are denied the right to move freely. Most villagers need to apply for permission to travel between locations in Rakhine State, a system that is enforced at checkpoints manned by security forces throughout the region. Since the coup, Rohingya have faced renewed arrest for undocumented travel and, as of mid-2021, 67 Rohingya were on trial while 58 had been convicted and sentenced up to two years for travel outside of Rakhine State. Travel restrictions and nighttime curfews can have life-and-death consequences, especially for those seeking treatment for acute medical conditions. An outbreak of diarrhea in Rohingya IDP camps that began in January 2022 has led to deaths that could have been prevented by timely medical treatment.

86.     The Rohingya continue to be effectively cut off from access to citizenship in Myanmar. Few Rohingya are able to meet the documentary hurdles imposed by the 1982 Citizenship Law, which is applied in an extremely discriminatory manner against the Rohingya. Rohingya persons are by-and-large unwilling to accept National Verification cards (NVC) because of the stipulation that they register as “Bengali,” effectively identifying them as foreigners.

87.     No progress has been made towards the safe, dignified and voluntary return of Rohingya who were driven from their homes. Many of the properties which belonged to Rohingya in villages from which they were driven by attacks in 2012, 2016 and 2017 have been razed and are now the site of new commercial projects, government buildings or military installations. Given current conditions, the Special Rapporteur considers the situation in Rakhine State to be unconducive to the voluntary, sustainable return of Rohingya refugees from Bangladesh.

 

 

Protection/Enjoyment of rights Detention Lack of documents/Access to documentation Remedy/Reparation Race/Ethnicity

Uzbekistan

64. The Special Rapporteur recommends that the Government of Uzbekistan to: (e) Accede to the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol, the 1954 Convention on the Status of Stateless Persons and the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness, and bring national legislation and...

64. The Special Rapporteur recommends that the Government of Uzbekistan to:

(e) Accede to the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol, the 1954 Convention on the Status of Stateless Persons and the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness, and bring national legislation and practices into line with these international standards;

International Instruments Legislative/Judicial/Administrative action
Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)

Madagascar

20. Taking note of target 16.9 of the Sustainable Development Goals, the Committee strongly urges the State party to: (a) Take steps to reverse the current downward trend of birth registrations in the country, including by allocating adequate resources for implementation of the civil...

20. Taking note of target 16.9 of the Sustainable Development Goals, the Committee strongly urges the State party to:

(a) Take steps to reverse the current downward trend of birth registrations in the country, including by allocating adequate resources for implementation of the civil registration and vital statistics national strategic plan and making concerted efforts, such as enabling late and free of charge registrations and increasing birth registration in areas with very low rates, especially in the region of Atsimo Andrefana;

(b) Amend its law on nationality in order to provide legal safeguards against statelessness at birth and to allow children adopted by a Malagasy mother and foreign father to gain the nationality;

(c) Consider acceding to the Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons of 1954 and the Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness of 1961;

(d) Seek technical assistance from the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and UNICEF, among others, for the implementation of these recommendations.

Adoption/Surrogacy Birth registration Gender International Instruments Legislative/Judicial/Administrative action Implementing measures - Other
Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)

Netherlands

18.     The Committee is concerned that conditions under which stateless children may apply for Dutch nationality under the present Nationality Act, which among others requires three years of legal residency, are very strict. Recalling its previous recommendations, the Committee recommends...

18.     The Committee is concerned that conditions under which stateless children may apply for Dutch nationality under the present Nationality Act, which among others requires three years of legal residency, are very strict. Recalling its previous recommendations, the Committee recommends that the State party:

(a)        Ensure that all children born in Aruba and Curaçao, including those with an irregular residence status, have access to birth registration and/or identity cards, and strengthen legal pathways to acquire a nationality;

(b)        Guarantee all stateless children born or present within the territory of the State party the right to acquire nationality irrespective of residency status;

(c)        Implement measures for ensuring that children with an “unknown” nationality, a status that leaves them unable to be registered as stateless and obtain international protection, do not remain in such a status for a prolonged period of time;

(d)        Ensure the access to education, health, and social services for stateless children and children with an “unknown” nationality;

(e)        Ensure that no child, including those between 16 and 17 years of age, is deprived of his or her nationality for actions that are considered to constitute a threat to national security, and also consider children’s best interests when such withdrawals of nationality are imposed on parents.

37. (...) (c) Ensure that the rights of asylum-seeking and refugee children in all constituent countries are guaranteed under legislation, including by: (i) ensuring that such children are registered and issued with legal identification documents;

Protection/Enjoyment of rights Remedy/Reparation Stateless Persons - Other Loss/Deprivation (Forced) migration context Access to nationality/Naturalization Nationality/Identity documentation Born on territory Birth registration Children - Other